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Corner Balancing: 993 Porsche C2S

Corner Balancing: 993 Porsche C2S | Image 1

Many people choose to lower their car for aesthetic purposes, some choose to lower their car for better cornering, and some choose to raise their car for increased ground clearance. Again, like every variable we have ever discusses there is a balance between too low and too high. In addition to ride height there is corner balancing. Although on most street cars we do not have the flexibility to move components around to adjust the static balance of the car we can affect the cross-weighting. Cross weighting is the percentage of weights between diagonal corners on the car.

If you do happen to be able to adjust the weight of heavy components (remove seats, relocate battery, install fuel cell, etc.) then we can actively try to achieve a more central balance. Also keep in mind we are not addressing squat or dive, which is referred to how much the level of the car moves up or down while accelerating and braking.

993 Porsche Corner Weighing | Image 2

Ride Height/Corner Balancing Notes:

  • Lower is usually better for cornering, As long as you still have sufficient suspension travel to avoid riding around on the bump stops of physically hitting things with your car. Sometimes suspension geometry can be compromised when lowering the car too much (such as roll center geometry) but in terms of body roll and weight transfer lower is better for performance.
  • With corner balancing, the goal is not to have every corner of the car reading the same exact weight, but rather to have a cross balance (the sum of (RF-LR) and (LF-RR)) balance as close to 50 percent of the total weight of the car. This ensures that the car will handle relatively equally turning right and left. Although counter intuitive raising the car in the corner that needs more weight will actually increase the amount of weight measured at the scale in that corner.
  • Raising the ride height in once corner will also raise the weight in the diagonal opposite corner, and vice versa (if you raise right rear, the left front will go up, if you lower the right front the left rear will go down too). Vice Versa with lowering the car, will raise the weight on that corner and the one diagonal to it.
  • Be realistic with what ride height you can live with. Don’t slam your car all the way down to the pavement unless it’s a race car or you are willing to deal with hitting bump stops and scraping your front lip.

Longacre Automotive Scale Digital Display | Image 3

There is SO much more to setting up a street or track car than what has been discussed above, but we are merely trying to cover the basics at a very cursory level. Want to Learn More about this service? Read the full article here.

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